Rx

By Jocelyn

Fran (95/65)…Grace (135/95)…Diane (225/155)…Nancy (95/65)…Elizabeth (135/95)…

 

 

Just to name a few. On average the difference between men’s and women’s rx’d weight is about 30%. Does that mean to say that women are on average 30% weaker than men? How did we come up with this number anyway?

 

Then there was the Nor Cal Qualifier. Some of those women’s weights were upwards of 40% lighter. Workout A was 500m row, 30 burpee, 10 jerks (165/95). Workout B was as many reps as possible in 10min of Cleans (185/105) and muscle ups where the men needed to complete a minimum of 10 of each movement while women needed to complete a minimum of 4. And then, of coarse, there was “Catch 22” where the men’s 22 deadlifts were 315lbs, while the women’s weight was 185lbs. That’s quite a big difference.

 

I once had a softball coach (granted this coach was 80 years old and way past his prime) who told us we should always carry two bats. One regular, and one lighter; because “when it’s that time of the month your weaker.” Hell, if he were a CrossFit HQ man we might have 3 Rx’d weight classes: 1 men’s, 1 women’s, and 1 women’s for “that time of the month.”

 

Some people think that we should do away with set poundage all together. There’s talk that it would be a more even playing field if we went to a body weight percentage system, in which the rx’d weight in a workout is based on how much you weigh. Yet another idea would be to implement weight classes. For competition’s sake that might even things out a bit, but then how would you apply this stuff to life out there? If I’ve got to pull an unconscious body from a burning building I certainly don’t have a choice about what class I compete in or what percentage of body weight I’ll be dragging. I can either save the person or I can’t.

 

With that school of thought, maybe there should be no difference at all in the prescribed weights on WODs. I heard Tony Budding say at my level I cert that technically there is not/should not be a men’s rx AND a women’s rx. The men’s rx is the rx’d weight, period. Why do you think they don’t list a women’s rx on the main site? I like wrapping my head around that one.

 

Now don’t get me wrong. I’m not ranting or carrying on here because I have some marvelous idea, or strong opinion about this stuff either way (although I am always in favor of prescribing more cowbell). Nor do I think I have the answer. But one thing’s for sure; all too often I glance up during a workout and think to myself, “dam, that 135 looks SO much heavier for him than this 95 feels for me.”

 

WOD:

“Fran”

 

And girls, if you can do it with the men’s RX, go for it!

 

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