The Thruster

Judy--physician, photographer, mother, and CrossFitter--en route to a legit 11 rounds on a 10 minute Cindy.

Judy--physician, photographer, mother, and CrossFitter--en route to a legit 11 rounds on a 10 minute half Cindy.

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Barbell training is, of course, nothing new, and resistance training is very old, but outside of CrossFit, the barbell is rarely used for non strength purposes (or bodybuilding).  Something like the WOD Grace was pretty unheard of before CrossFit.  In CrossFit, the barbell wears many hats, not just a strength building one.

The thruster, a CrossFit staple, possibly the most dreaded movement in its broad repertoire, is pretty emblematic for the way in which CrossFit uses the barbell. The thruster seems to be fairly unique to CrossFit.  Although the movement is probably not a CrossFit invention, I am sure that it must have been seen at times in collegiate strength and conditioning weight rooms before the widespread proliferation of CrossFit, it was never assigned the importance that CrossFit has given it.

The thruster is rarely used with truly heavy weight, even “Heavy” Fran is only 135#, but the demands it places on the body are huge.  Somehow it is so much more than just the sum of its parts, a front squat and a push press.  The range-of-motion with a thruster is just about as big as any barbell movement, and the forward inclination of the torso as the barbell is driven out of the hole and overhead adds greatly to its difficulty. In fact, the aforementioned 135 pounds for repetitions will seriously tax people for whom 135 pounds is usually a light warm up weight. Done fast for time will put most people on the floor.

And that is unique to Crossfit.

Thoughts?  Please post to Comments.

Workout:

Thruster 7×3

Then:

Tabata triplet (20 seconds on/10 seconds off for 8 rounds)

Kettlebell Swing 73/53#

Box Jump 24″

Plate Situp 35/25#

Post WOD completed and score to Comments.